Mary Riepma Ross Film Theater
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Hixson-Lied College of Fine & Performing Arts

April 15, Tuesday

ADMISSION:
Evening
$9.75 Adults
$7.25 Students
$7.25 Children
$7.75 Military
$7.75 Seniors
$6.75 Members

Matinee
$7.75 Adults
$6.75 Students
$6.75 Children
$6.75 Military
$7.25 Seniors
$6.25 Members

Children are 12 and under, Seniors are 60 and older

Students and Military must show a valid ID to receive discount

We accept cash, check, NCard, Visa, and Mastercard

Box Office Opens 30 Minutes Before Showtimes



RATINGS:
Many of the films shown at The Ross are not rated due to the prohibitive cost of acquiring a rating from the Motion Picture Association of America. Consequently, as many of these films contain graphic content, viewer discretion is advised.

LOCATION:
313 N. 13 STREET
LINCOLN, NEBRASKA




The Nebraska Arts Council, a state agency, has supported the programs of this organization through its matching grants program funded by the Nebraska Legislature, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Nebraska Cultural Endowment. Visit www.nebraskaartscouncil.org for information on how the Nebraska Arts Council can assist your organization, or how you can support the Nebraska Cultural Endowment.
SYNECDOCHE, NEW YORK
Visit the Official Website
 
SYNECDOCHE, NEW YORK
Directed By: Charlie Kaufman
Runtime: 2 hours, 4 minutes
Rating: R for language and some sexual content/nudity
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics
Country: USA
Release Date: October 24, 2008
With: Philip Seymour Hoffman, Samantha Morton, Michelle Williams, & Catherine Keener.

Synopsis
To say that Charlie Kaufman’s “Synecdoche, New York” is one of the best films of the year or even one closest to my heart is such a pathetic response to its soaring ambition that I might as well pack it in right now. That at least would be an appropriate response to a film about failure, about the struggle to make your mark in a world filled with people who are more gifted, beautiful, glamorous and desirable than the rest of us — we who are crippled by narcissistic inadequacy, yes, of course, but also by real horror, by zits, flab and the cancer that we know (we know!) is eating away at us and leaving us no choice but to lie down and die. — Manohla Dargis, The New York Times



Theater director Caden Cotard (Philip Seymour Hoffman) is mounting a new play. His life catering to suburban blue-hairs at the local regional theater in Schenectady, New York is looking bleak. His wife Adele (Catherine Keener) has left him to pursue her painting in Berlin, taking their young daughter Olive (Sadie Goldstein) with her. His therapist, Madeleine Gravis (Hope Davis), is better at plugging her best-seller than she is at counseling him. A new relationship with the alluringly candid Hazel (Samantha Morton) has prematurely run aground. And a mysterious condition is systematically shutting down each of his autonomic functions, one by one.

Worried about the transience of his life, he leaves his home behind. He gathers an ensemble cast into a warehouse in New York City, hoping to create a work of brutal honesty. He directs them in a celebration of the mundane, instructing each to live out their constructed lives in a growing mockup of the city outside.

However, as the city inside the warehouse grows, Caden's own life veers wildly off the tracks. Somewhere in Berlin, his daughter is growing up under the questionable guidance of Adele's friend, Maria (Jennifer Jason Leigh). His lingering attachments to both Adele and Hazel are causing him to helplessly drive his new marriage to actress Claire (Michelle Williams) into the ground. Sammy (Tom Noonan) and Tammy (Emily Watson), the actors hired to play Caden and Hazel, are making it difficult for the real Caden to revive his relationship with the real Hazel. The textured tangle of real and theatrical relationships blurs the line between the world of the play and that of Caden's own deteriorating reality.

The years rapidly fold into each other, and Caden buries himself deeper into his masterpiece. As he pushes the limits of his relationships, both personally and professionally, a change in creative direction arrives in Millicent Weems (Dianne Wiest), a celebrated theater actress who may offer Caden the break he needs.--© Sony Pictures Classics


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